Welcome to Interim 2015!

Dear students,                                                

I am pleased to be able to provide this introduction to our January 2015 Interim curriculum.  Faculty and staff at BVU have worked hard to create an exciting array of Interim classes for you.  We intentionally offer to you courses that will expand your creativity, cultural awareness, analytical abilities, and awareness of important conversations in today’s world. Our wish is that you will use Interim 2015 to seek opportunities outside your major programs of study where possible and investigate new ways of discovery and knowing.

We continue to expect high academic achievement from you. We ask faculty to fully employ class-time with you as well as engage you in meaningful preparatory work outside of class-time for 3 to 6 hours daily. You will find listed here descriptions for a variety of courses. Information in the descriptions below identifies if a course fulfills major/minor and/or general education requirement.  All courses with the INTM notation fulfill elective credit toward graduation only.

As you review this list of course offerings, you will note that during our three-week January Interim, all of our course options offer distinctive educational experiences that align with the University’s overarching academic goals and objectives.  These classes allow learning to take place within and outside the classroom as we offer you opportunities to enhance your potential for life-long success through innovative and imaginative opportunities. We believe Interim, with its travel courses, internships, residencies, and enrichment courses, is essential to the achievement of these goals.

Sincerely,

David Evans, Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs


Interim Policies

Interim courses meet the full Interim calendar for a minimum of 150 minutes each day. Students, be advised that missing any classes during Interim is hazardous to successfully completing Interim; a day of class during January is equivalent of a week during a regular semester. As a BVU student you must be enrolled in and attending an Interim course to remain in the residence halls; if you are not enrolled and attending your course, you will be asked to leave campus for the Interim period or any portion of it remaining at the time you stop attending to your academic work and class attendance. All courses, including internships and travel courses,  are commonly 3 credit hours. Internship credit hours are typically determined by the number of 40 hour-weeks contained within the internship experience. A three-credit hour internship, for example, typically requires three, 40-hour work weeks. See your internship supervisor for complete information on requirements.

Courses under the INTM department code carry elective credit toward graduation. If a course offers major and/or general education credit that designation is included in the course description and noted with the course designation other than an INTM department code (i.e. JAPN, HONR, BIOL, etc.). Some courses listed have been offered in previous years. You MAY NOT take an Interim course (INTM) which you have previously taken; doing so will cause you to lose the 3 credits from the previous occurrence since the course will be treated as a course repeat.

Classes meet daily. The grading system is determined by the instructor and indicated in the course description below as well as on the course syllabus.  If student option is indicated, you may choose between P/F (Pass/Fail) or letter grade (ABCDF). For those courses with student option as the grading system, the grading option may be converted through 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015 at the Registrar’s Office. All travel courses and internships are graded P/F.

Interim Enrollment Expectations

Buena Vista University hopes all BVU students will participate in an Interim learning opportunity. New first-year students are required to enroll in Interim. There will be no tuition, board and/or room refunds for full-time students who elect not to participate in Interim. Students will NOT be permitted to remain in the residence halls during Interim if they are not enrolled in and attending an Interim course. For further information on enrollment requirements, students should refer to the catalog under which they entered Buena Vista University.

  • Students enrolled in BVU travel courses will receive a stipend of their meal plan fees automatically. Students enrolled in travel courses need not complete a meal refund application.
  • Students enrolled in courses, such as an internship, field observation or practicum, requiring them to live off campus during Interim may apply for a stipend of meal plan charges. Students must be enrolled prior to making application for a meal stipend; applications for the meal stipend (and enrollment in the experience) must be made no later than 5 p.m. on MONDAY, DEC. 1, 2014. To apply for a meal stipend, complete the information requested through Step 1 on the Interim Meal Stipend Request Form found on the Registrar’s web page at:
    http://www.bvu.edu/bv/registrar/forms.dot
    .  Once Step 1 is completed, deliver the form to the Associate Dean’s Office (DE 107) for processing.

No requests for meal refunds after 5 p.m. on Dec. 1, 2014 will be granted. Students seeking internships, etc. are advised to be working well in advance so that you will have final decisions on placements in time to qualify for meal reimbursement if the experience will require you to be off-campus.

Interim and Spring Registration Dates

Students register for Interim and Spring semester courses during a single registration period during late October and early November.

  • Oct. 13 for  Honors students
  • Oct. 14 - Oct. 17 for seniors and juniors
  • Oct. 22 – Oct. 24 for sophomores
  • Oct. 27 - Oct. 31  for first-year students
  • Nov. 3 - Nov. 6  for special students
  • Beginning Nov. 7, decisions on canceling low enrollment courses will occur. It is in students' best interests to register during their assigned times.

2015 Interim Course Descriptions

Residencies

Honors (Honor Students Only)

HONORS SCIENCE                                                             HONR 220           3CR

This is a course to fulfill the Honors Program Exploration course in Science.  The course will begin as an examination of the large scale surveys on American sexual behaviors conducted by Alfred Kinsey in 1948 and 1953 and the follow-up study from the Kinsey Institute at the University of Indiana in 2010.  The class will build upon that initial look at behaviors to introduce and explore many specific issues broadly related modern day American sexual culture.  For example, two issues to be explored will be modern day relationships and sexual behavior and the second, the increased awareness or prevalence of transgender issues in society.  From here, the class will reflect on the changes, or not, of the Kinsey reports that may be apparent to illuminate changes in the attitudes over sixty years.  This will then be explored in depth in small research groups trying to find research evidence that can further help explain or understand the issue.  Students will be learning to look for primary academic research, in this case both biology based and social science based, as well as other academic areas where appropriate and input from the lay press.  For example, in looking at relationships information and research will focus on the change in the social power and standing of women from 1948 to 2010.  One of the goals is to illustrate the differences between research in the academic disciplines, examine strength and weaknesses of the research and finally to see what gets distilled from the research to the popular press where often cultural norms are dictated.  The research will be done in class, specifically for the purposes of class discussion.   The class will operate with a simple introduction of the topic, followed by a set time for small group research, and concluded by a minimum of an hour of open discussion of the research and information regarding the topic.  In addition, every student will be researching a topic on their own in further depth to culminate in a class presentation in the last two days.  Grading will be based on (in ascending order of importance) use of class research time to generate sources, participation in discussion and the final oral presentation. GWST credit.

Dr. Thom Bonagura, Asst.  Professor of Biology
Grading:  Letter Grade
Course Limit:  20
Time:  9 a.m. – Noon

Creativity & Creative Expression

HOW TO BECOME A RECORDING STAR                                INTM 110      3 CR

This course is designed to help learn and understand the essential knowledge to become a recording artist in today’s world. Topics covered will include current trends in the music industry, basic music theory, and lyric writing. Other areas covered will include how to market songs, promo-press kits, and artist promotion. Students will embark on a variety of activities in class that will help to develop and encourage good song writing skills through class lecture, group interaction, and performance. The students will be expected to participate in an actual performance of the music they had written during the course of the class.

Dr. David A. Klee, Sr., Associate Professor of Music
Grading:  P/F
Course Limit: 20
Time:  9 a.m. to Noon  

DEVISING AS A METHOD FOR CREATING PERFORMANCE         THEA 380      3 CR

“Devising is a process of making theatre that enables a group of performers to be physically and practically creative in the sharing and shaping of an original product that directly emanates from assembling, editing, and re-shaping individuals’ contradictory experiences of the world,” so states Alison Oddey in the introduction to Devising Theatre.  Devising is not a new approach to creating theatre, but it has become more widespread in recent years, and it is a particularly effective means for developing performance activities among diverse groups of participants in a variety of settings.  Students in this course will collaborate on the development and performance of an original work for the stage, and all participants will be involved either on or backstage for the production, which will be produced and performed as the second show of the University Theatre 2014/15 season. Students can expect to exercise and develop their abilities in communication, critical thinking, imagination, creativity, and organizational and project management.  Please note: production obligations continue after the Interim term is completed.  Rehearsals, technical and dress rehearsals, and performances are January 28-February 14 and are required of all participants.  

Dr. Bethany Larson, Associate Professor of Theatre
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 15
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon &1:30-3:30 p.m.

PRODUCTION AND PERFORMANCE                                                    THEA 462    3 CR

Practical hands-on leadership experience in the direction, design, or dramaturgical research of a theatrical production. May be repeated for up to six credits. It is advised that students complete at least one section of THEA 242 and 352 before requesting to enroll in this course.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Mr. David Walker, Asst. Prof. of Theatre
Grading: Student Option
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

Cultural Explorations

80’S TIME MACHINE: VIEWING THE DECADE THROUGH JOHN HUGHES’ FILMS  INTM 111     3 CR

Calling all brains, beauties, jocks, rebels, and recluses: Writer and director John Hughes’ teen flicks of the 1980s, such as Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, and Ferris Beuhler’s Day Off, were the first—and some argue, the best—of their kind. In 1991, cultural historian Neal Gabler predicted in The New York Times that people would watch these films long into the future because they “define every teenage generation.” In this course, we will familiarize ourselves with the Hughes’ canon of teen films, get to know the so-called “Brat-Pack” actors who starred in them, read about how the films influenced Generation X, and discuss what meaning the films might have for today’s viewers. We will time travel frequently between the 1980s and today, watching the films and learning about the entertainment, technology, politics, news events, and scandals that defined the decade. Assignments will include taking a pre-test to establish the class’ baseline level of knowledge about these films; reading and discussing relevant texts; writing a series of short critical and creative responses to connect the readings, films, and viewers; presenting in small groups on one film and related 80s topics for context; and completing a reflective final to conclude our journey through the decade.

Dr. Gwen Hart, Asst. Professor of English
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

AMERICAN POP CULTURE: 1960's                                               INTM 116      3 CR

The objectives of this course are to provide students with an appreciation of American Popular Culture of the 1960’s.  We are defining popular culture rather broadly to include: the arts (theatre/music/film/painting), literature, sports, television and radio, fashion and home life.  We will also take a look at the growing Civil Rights Movement and the anti-war efforts of the era.  The class will take a look at some of the great music of the era and the musical groups that defined the sound of the era.  We will also take a look at three important movies that helped define the decade.  Students will be divided into groups for group presentations, reviews of the movies we watch will be required, a final project on an important person of the decade will be required, and we will read one short novel from the decade.

Dr. Michael Whitlatch, Dean of School of Communications & Arts and Professor of Theatre 
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20  
Time:  9 a.m. to Noon.

RELIGION AND CULTURE: JESUS GOES TO THE MOVIES            RELI 122    3 CR

In a culture that tends to worship both Hollywood and Christianity, it’s hardly surprising that so many contemporary films seek to depict Jesus on the big screen. Hollywood has spent millions of dollars interpreting the Gospels.  In this course, we begin with our own exploration of the Gospels and then through an examination of several films focusing on Jesus, we explore the interface between religion and society.  Basic forms and views of religious phenomena (as they relate to Jesus, Hollywood and film) in their social and institutional context, including encounter, ritual, community, practice, ethics, and mysticism, will be examined.  In this course, we will 1) read, think carefully about, and discus the portraits of Jesus presented in portions of the Gospels, 2) learn about and utilize Critical Theory/Film Theory, 3) watch, critically review and discuss several films such as, but not limited to, Jesus Christ Superstar, The Last Temptation of Christ, Jesus of Montreal, Passions of the Christ, etc., 3) On your own, you will write reading responses and a few critical reviews, and working in teams of two or three, you will create a presentation and lead discussions on particular films and their portrayal of Jesus.  This course is a general education explorations – humanities course.

Dr. Swasti Bhattacharyya, Prof. of Religion 
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

GRAND CHINA DISCOVERY                                                       INTM 124      3 CR

What do ice cream, gunpowder; paper, fireworks, and umbrellas have in common?  They were all invented in China!  China is an amazing country that is the home to almost one fifth of the world’s population.  It buys more than 86% of all the bicycles manufactured and uses more than 200 languages.  Halfway around the globe, China is a land where today is tomorrow.  This class helps you explore this fascinating country.  Learn how to use chop sticks, discover papercuts, do calligraphy with a brush, eat wonderful food, and research the country which gave the world Cinderella!  Come and explore the wonderful world of China!!!

Ms. Jingxia Wu, Chinese Instructor
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

Math and Science Exploration & Thought

THE CHEMISTRY OF FOOD                                                         INTM 126       3   CR           

Food is a language that transcends culture and time, providing not only nutrition, but a cascade of emotions as well as fuel for the human body. This course will dive into the science behind how our bodies and brain interpret food, as well as the chemistry behind how food is prepared. Topics will include neurogastronomy, the science of flavor, foams, emulsions, solutions, crystallization, proteins, biochemistry of food such as yeast, and others. Students will learn basic chemistry concepts as applied to the kitchen. Class time will be spent in lecture, discussion of readings, and hands on cooking and lab experiments such as making marshmallows, metric fudge, and testing the antibiotic properties of spices. There will be three books assigned for the class and students will be expected to turn in reading responses, lab notebooks detailing the experiments, a midterm exam, final exam, individual paper, and group presentation on a chosen topic.

Dr. Melanie Hauser, Asst. Professor of Chemistry
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

HOW THINGS WORK                                                                                INTM 127     3 CR

Have you ever used a gadget and wondered how it works? While most of us are curious about the inner workings of gadgets and machines, we often feel intimidated in our efforts to really understand them.  In this course we will try to satisfy the curious and educate the perplexed by working to understand the mechanisms and principles behind technological wonders, as well as folding in the basic scientific principles that make each of them work.  One component of the course will involve hands-on activities, some of which include building an electric motor and the use of nanoscience in the construction and testing of a solar cell.  We will also be discussing biofuels, which will tentatively include a trip to an ethanol production facility.   Another component of the course will be presentations.  Students, working individually or as small groups, will ultimately choose a variety of machines or gadgets, either simple or complex in design, which they find interesting.  After researching their gadgets, they will demonstrate how these gadgets or machines do what they do by presenting their findings to both the instructor and to their classmates.  Presentations will include not only using technology, such as PowerPoint or video, but also hands-on demonstrations, where applicable, with working models.  If you are curious about gadgets, machines and technological innovation, this may be the course for you.  One book suggested for this course will be The New Way Things Work by David Macaulay.  Field trip to John Deere Tractor & Engine Works in Waterloo, IA and Platinum ethanol production facility. 

Dr. Tim Ehler, Associate Professor of Chemistry
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20         
Time:  9 a.m. to Noon                                      

RECREATIONAL MATH                                                           INTM 128                  3  CR

This class will explore mathematical investigations, games, puzzles and brain-teasers.  You don’t need an extensive math background – just Math 100, Algebra Review.  What you do need is an interest in thinking logically and problem-solving.  This is a hands-on class with minimal lecture.  You will play Equations (a mathematical version of Scrabble), investigate what a circle looks like in taxi cab geometry, explore spirolaterals, build models of interesting geometric figures, learn various mental math techniques so you can amaze your friends, discover the mathematics behind magic tricks (and once again amaze your friends), learn how to make hexaflexagons like the slightly bored mathematicians who invented them, and solve a variety of math brain-teasers.  Students will be given a variety of mathematical puzzles and investigations to pursue outside of class.  In addition, students will be asked to research and present on a mathematical topic.  While this is not a math education class and is open to students with any major, it does provide future math teachers with some interesting enrichment topics. 

Ms. Kathleen McDaniel, Instructor of Mathematics
Grading: P/F
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY: INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY              BIOL450      3 CR

Some of the biggest industries in the world revolve around pharmaceuticals including their research use in medicine to treat illness.  A proper understanding of pharmacology, where medications come from, their potential applications and drawbacks is essential for treating the illnesses they are intended for. This topic is not routinely offered at the undergraduate level and can therefore be confusing when students enter graduate school – be it Medical, Pharmacy, Dental, or Veterinarian School. This course, taught with the help of two fourth-year professional school students (medical and pharmacy), will go over basic pathophysiology and begin discussing the biology and chemistry that underlies the mechanisms of action for medications which are used to treat a variety of diseases including but not limited to cancer, blood pressure, diabetes, microbial infections, and pain. There will also be some hands-on cell-culture-based laboratory work studying the effects of pharmacological agents on cell viability and function.  This course will be interactive with opportunities for individual presentations and research as time permits.  Prerequisites include BIOL164 (Biological Principles II) and CHEM261 (Organic Chemistry I)

Casandra Pauley is a fourth year Pharmacy Doctorate Student at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC).  She is doing one of her formal professional rotations as a teaching rotation.  This assignment has been approved by UNMC and Dr. Brian Lenzmeier has been approved by UNMC to serve as her official preceptor and mentor for this rotation.

Grant Turner is a fourth year Medical Student at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.  He will participate in the development and delivery of this course as his time permits.

Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

Personal Professional Development

IF YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’RE GOING…. HOW ABOUT CAREER PLANNING?       INTM 129    3 CR

If you are a first or second year student, and uncertain about your major or career direction, this course may be for you!  We’ll operate under the model that career decisions are like many decisions we make in life: a combination of gathering information about yourself and your options, and applying a mix of logic, reason, and intuition to make a good decision.  The course will include a number of self-assessments (Strong Interest Inventory, MBTI, Strengths Quest), occupational information (FOCUS online information system), as well as online and printed resources.  In addition, we will help you identify professionals with whom you will conduct informational interviews, shadowing experiences, and potential classroom visits.  Finally, you will make an in-class presentation on what you’ve found, as well as contribute to a class-wide document that compiles information on a wide range of fields and occupations.  We’ll also learn about the process of decision-making, the paradox of choice, and the power of networking.  Among a number of resources, we will use If You Don't Know Where You're Going, You'll Probably End Up Somewhere Else: Finding a Career and Getting a Life... by David P. Campbell, a fine career book as well as a great book on decision-making.

Mr. Jeff Stocco, Director of Career & Personal Development
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

FORGIVENESS                                                                                            INTM 130      3 CR

During our three weeks together, we will look at forgiveness from both the psychological and theological perspective through readings, personal reflections, and intentional group discussion. This is not a therapy class but an opportunity for us to explore forgiveness through the eyes, words and perceptions of individuals who have struggled to come to terms with self and others in light of their sometimes painful history. The text will be Forgiveness as a Choice, by Robert Enright.  Students will do daily journaling and reflection with that text. The second book is The Shack  by William Young. The path to God is paved with questions—sometimes frightening and deeply painful ones. Unfolding in this captivating novel are questions we carry deep within. This little novel invites the reader to come in close to a God of mercy and love, and possibly discover hope and healing. Several DVD’s will also be viewed, including Amish Forgiveness, Rwanda: Living Forgiveness, The Power of Forgiveness, and Around the Bend.

Rev. Ken Meissner, Campus Chaplain
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit:  20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

ON COURSE:  STRATEGIES FOR CREATING SUCCESS IN COLLEGE AND IN LIFE   INTM 131         3 CR

Do you want to succeed in the classroom and in life?  This course can help you identify areas of your life you want to improve, set goals, and work to make positive changes using critical and creative problem solving.  Students will read, discuss ways to improve their approach to academic challenges, and learn new strategies for personal responsibility, self-motivation, interdependence, and self-esteem.  The class will be spent in discussion of readings from the required text and other selected reading, in-class activities, and responsive writing.  Self-assessment, writing activities, and small group work will also be used.  Students will complete a presentation to demonstrate how they will apply the On Course skills to become more successful.

Ms. Donna Musel, Director of Center of Academic Excellence and Mr. Mark Shea, Director of Student Success
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit:  20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

EVENT PLANNING & MANAGEMENT                                 INTM 132          3 CR

Event planning is the process of planning a festival, ceremony, competition, party, concert, or convention. Skills to successful event planning include budgeting, establishing dates, selecting and reserving the venue, acquiring permits, and coordinating transportation and parking and much more. Event planning may also include: developing a theme, arranging for speakers or entertainment, contract negotiations, consultation with clients, coordinating location support such as facilities, security, catering, police, fire, portable toilets, parking, signage, emergency plans, health care professionals, and cleanup.  This class will serve as a practical step-by-step guide to exploring strategies and techniques of event planning.  Whether students are interested in event planning as a career or just interested in planning special events, they will get a comprehensive experience covering all the angles from little details to the big picture. Students will gain this knowledge through a selection of short readings, guest panels, and media resources. Goals of this class include the desire for students to develop a greater understanding of what it means to plan an event and to demonstrate their knowledge by ending the course with an event management plan for a realistic event.  The class time will be spent in group discussions and hands on activities. Students will be challenged to be creative, intuitive, adaptable, and detail oriented.  There will be time to process, to share, and to connect in fun ways all through the lens of event planning.  Academic requirements for this class include interviewing prospective clients and professionals in the event planning field, developing an extensive event management checklist, and a group presentation culminating the experience in the class and their event management plan for a specific event.  During the class students will begin by participating in low skill activities such as planning a birthday party and the creation of event management checklists.  As the class progresses activities will hold a higher impact on those who participate.  These high impact activities will include, the wedding planning, corporate events and community festivals, as well as sustainable event planning.  Among the in class activities there will also be an emphasis on bringing in local and regional event/activities planners to share knowledge and experience.  Some of these individuals include; Kings Pointe representative, Tyson Events Center personnel, and Forum Office staff. 

Dr. Rebekah Neary-DeLaPorte, Director of Student Activities & Leadership Development
Grading: P/F
Course Limit:  20
Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

CRISIS MANAGEMENT 101                                                         INTM 133             3  CR

A crisis can challenge our day to day lives by disrupting our normal routines and force us to reconsider what we are doing in order to overcome the obstacle before us.  Crisis can range in size and in nature.  This course will provide students with necessary resources and knowledge to confront whatever challenge may come before them. This course hopes to accomplish this by guiding students through a four-stage crisis management framework that includes: landscape survey, strategic planning, crisis management, and organizational learning.

Dr. Dijon DeLaPorte, Director of  Residence Life and Housing
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit: 20
Time: 1p.m. to 4p.m.

Historical & Literary Foundations

AMERICAN WOMEN: SUFFRAGISTS, ABOLITIONISTS, AND RADICALS          GWST 150     3 CR

Often women’s actions and words are left out of history books. This course will introduce students to American women whose contributions to philosophical thought and political activism are often under-appreciated. Students will learn about these women and read works by them. We will focus on women like Sojourner Truth, born into slavery but she became one of the most influential abolitionists of her time, and her famous “Ain’t I A Woman” speech; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a close friend and collaborator of the (unjustly) far more famous Susan B. Anthony, and her “A Declaration of Sentiments” written for the Seneca Falls Convention; Voltairine De Cleyre, a contemporary of Emma Goldman’s, who was a very different kind of anarchist. De Cleyre rails against unjust laws concerning marriage and unrealistic ideals of beauty in her 1895 lecture “Sex Slavery”; and much, much more.  Course content is interdisciplinary drawing on a range of sources including books, trial transcripts, essays, films, and more. Students should expect reading and writing assignments, participation during class discussions, and an independent research project.

Ms. Christy Horpedahl, M.A in Social Sciences, University of Chicago
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit: 20
Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

THE FORGOTTEN WAR: HOW THE GREAT WAR SHAPED OUR MODERN WORLD   INTM 135     3 CR

Why is the Great War (World War I) the most unique, savage, and senseless conflict in history?  This course is an in-depth study of the causes of the Great War, (World War I), and its aftermath, which set the violent course for the 20th century and still influences our world a century later.  The evolution and “morality” of total war will be a focus, as well as the unique features of trench warfare.  Students will learn how the Great War shaped modern and postmodern thought.  In addition, the Great War’s influence on art, language, literature, and even popular music will be explored.  Selected short readings, as well as a graphic novel or novel set during the Great War will help give insight into psychological and physical havoc created by war.  Also, a film (or films) will provide an example of cinema’s attempt to depict the Great War and its effect on ordinary people.  Activities include discussions of readings, debates on war and ethics, as well as individual or group research and presentations.

Mr. Don Parkhurst, Master’s Education, Morningside College
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

SCIENCE WRITING: THE TECHNICAL, THE PRACTICAL, AND THE EMANCIPATORY     INTM 136   3 CR

Students will learn and practice the quantitative and qualitative research methods that writing teachers provide scientists to produce clear writing. Students should expect to read, critique, test, revise, and edit science writing that addresses disciplinary, professional, and popular audiences:

  • Technical documents. The laboratory notes, field notebooks, and laboratory reports that record research read by peers and professors within scientific disciplines.
  • Practical reports. The research reports, grant proposals, and academic papers that communicate scientific processes and research findings to colleagues, professors, and employers from allied disciplines.
  • Emancipatory nonfiction. The persuasive books and articles that teach scientific processes and findings to interested professionals and the general public.

During class, students will discuss required readings, study interviews with scientists, and conduct readability and usability tests of science writing. The course intends to help students think, write, and speak like seasoned communicators of science. Without writing, science is silent.

Dr. James McFadden, Assoc. Professor of English
Grading: Letter Grade
Course Limit: 20
Time: 1p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sports & Wellness

CHING CHI KUNG FU: MEDITATION IN MOTION                   INTM 118                 3 CR

This course teaches students 17 basic movements of Ching Chi Kung Fu and explores the belief system behind the Tao and the ancient Chinese healing system which is the Meridian Theory.  It is a course on spiritual and physical wellness but in a completely different vein than an American typically looks at wellness.  We will discuss time and space, our eating patterns, our movements and various ways we bring harm to our bodies.  Through daily practice, learn how to become  practitioners for life. 

Dr. Jo Bachman, Ph.D., The Union Institute; M.A., Lesley College, Arts Institute for Human Growth and Development and  M.A. Holistic Studies and the Healing Arts
Grading:  Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time:  9 a.m. to Noon  

THE ROLE OF SPORTS IN SOCIETY                                          INTM 142           3 CR

In today’s society, sports continue to play an ever increasing role.  We inhabit a world in which sport is an international phenomenon, it is important for politicians and world leaders to be associated with sports personalities; it contributes to the economy, some of the most visible international spectacles are associated with sporting events; it is part of the social and cultural fabric of different localities, regions and nations, its transformative potential is evident in some of the poorest areas of the world; it is important to the television and film industry, the tourist industry; and it is regularly associated with social problems and issues such as crime, health, violence, social division, labor migration, economic and social regeneration and poverty.  The focus of this class will be the interaction between society and sports while exploring whether or not sports act a mirror of society or sports are helping to shape society. The course is comprised of three different units focusing first on sport, globalism and other communities then sport identities and alternative lifestyles, and lastly sport, social division and change.  Students will read extensively about the subject matter prior to class.  Class time will be divided into three sections: lecture, video presentation and class discussion.  Students will then be asked to write their own personal reflections on how the material answers the question on what is the role of sports in society.

Ms. Jamie Schoenherr, Assistant Athletic Trainer
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

GOLF MANAGEMENT                                                                              INTM 143      3 CR

This course offers golf course management through the eyes and experience of a PGA Club Golf Professional.  The course will offer a picture of the many dimensions of the golf business as it is in 2015.  It is an opportunity to investigate a possible exciting and realistic career related to both business and sport.  Subject areas covered in the course include: Sports Business Management; Retail – Equipment and Apparel; Golf Instruction – Beginning to Advanced Instructional Methodology; Budgeting your Facility – Income and Expense; Ownership – Facility, Inventory, Equipment; Grounds Maintenance – Equipment, Turf Management, Chemicals, Personnel; Food and Beverage Operations; Country Clubs, Privately Owned Operations, Public and Municipal Operations; Professional Association Requirements – PGA, GSCA, GCMA.  Students will not need any specific texts prior to the course.  Instructor will provide study materials.  Research and study projects will require internet use.  Daily attendance will be required.  A portion of the time will require hands on use of golf clubs.  Appropriate dress will be important for those days.

Mr. Randy Rohlfsen, B.A.E. in Physical Education and Business, M.S.E. in Physical Education, Wayne State College;  PGA Golf Professional/Manager/Owner of Emerald Hills Golf Course in Arnolds Park and Emerald Valley Country Club in Lakefield, MN
Grading:  P/F
Course Limit:  20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon  

HOW TO LIVE TO BE 100: A THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL APPROACH           INTM 144     3 CR

The focus of this course will be how to establish a healthy lifestyle that will add quality years to your life.  Class time will be spent on both the theoretical concepts as well as practical projects.  We will learn about how things affect our overall physical wellness but the focus will be on how to make positive changes.  For example, not only will we learn about how strength training can increase your wellness but we will learn how to set up a program and most importantly we will get in the weight room and actually learn how to use the equipment.  The goal will be to gain the knowledge and experience needed to allow students to implement all of the course topics into their everyday lives.  Topics to be included are: What is Wellness, Behavior Modification, Nutrition, Body Composition and Weight Management, Cardiovascular Training, Strength Training, Muscular Flexibility, Preventing Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer, and lifetime activity.  This course will have a lab component in which students will be expected to participate in the various physical activities discussed during class.  Students will be graded based on participation, unit quizzes, nightly homework assignments, a final presentation and a final exam.

Ms. Katherine Frick, Assistant Athletic Trainer
Grading: Student Option
Course Limit:  20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

STRESS MANAGEMENT FROM A PROFESSIONAL STRESSOR                                 INTM  145            3 CR

In today’s 24/7 culture stress is a part of everyday life.  Some stress is a good thing but excessive stress can have negative effects and these effects are not uncommon.  Forty-three percent of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress. Seventy-five percent to 90% of all doctor's office visits are for stress-related ailments and complaints. Stress can play a part in problems such as headaches, high blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, skin conditions, asthma, arthritis, depression, and anxiety.  As a professional stressor myself, I designed this course to explore how we can better manage our stress.  Topics include: How Do you React to Stress, Body Awareness, Relaxation Techniques, Autogenics, Thought Stopping and Worry Control, Nutrition and Exercise, as well as Assertiveness Training and Job or School Stress Management.  Students will read and be taught about what the techniques are and then we will actually do them in class so students can see what works for them.  At the end of class students will present a paper and plan on how they can utilize what they have learned to try to take control of their stress. A textbook is required for this class.

Mr. James Day, Instructor of Exercise Science/Head Athletic Trainer
Grading:  Student Option
Course Limit: 20
Time:  9 a.m. to Noon  

RUNNING, READING, AND REFLECTING                                      INTM 146      3 CR

Research shows a positive correlation between exercise and cognitive function, creativity, and mood.  Running is an easy and inexpensive way to improve physical and mental health, while also helping students perform better in college classes.  This course is designed to motivate students as they fit physical activity into their busy lives. This class will deal with the 3 A’s of running – athletics, academics, and aesthetics.  Inspiration and perspiration will be incorporated into each class session, with every day beginning with a presentation, discussion, film, guest speaker, or panel, then ending with a running session (possibly run/walk at first), toning and strength work, and/or cross training.  Learning about the lore, legends, and logistics of the sport will be an integral part of the class, while innovative activities will keep things lively and interesting!  Students will be required to keep a daily journal and exercise log during the three week session, using these as the basis for a reflection paper.  A reasonable fitness goal is that participants work up to the 5K (3.1 mile) distance by the end of the session and maybe even do so at an area race!  The class will use Frank Shorter’s book, Peak Performance, as a reference.  Also students will need to read at least one other book related to running (biography, autobiography, training book, nutrition guide, novel, etc.) and report on it to the class in a method of their choice.  In addition, the class will work on creative projects designed to delve more into the history of running and/or involve others in this lifetime sport.  Students will have access to the indoor track and will also be doing some running outdoors.  Students should each bring a good pair of running shoes, and it would be ideal if they would have a little running experience.

Ms. Andriette Wickstrom, B.S., Winona State University, successful marathon runner having qualified and ran Chicago and Boston marathons numerous times
Grading: P/F
Course Limit: 20
Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

Internships and Field Experiences

In order to register for an internship, you must file an “Application for Internship” located on the Registrar’s form web page: bvu.edu/bv/registrar/forms.dot.

ACCT 495    

Dr. Scott Anderson

AMGT 495

Professor Mary Mello-Nee

ART 495

Professor Mary Mello-Nee

BCHM 495

Dr. James Hampton

BIOL 495

Dr. James Hampton

BIOL 496

Dr. James Hampton

BUSN 496

Dr. Scott Anderson

CHEM 495

Dr. Tim Ehler

CMSC 495

Professor Jason Shepherd

COMM 495

Dr. Beth Lamoureux (Limit 15)

CRIM 495

Neal McNabb

DIGI 495

Professor Jamii Claiborne

ECON 495

Dr. Scott Anderson           

EDCO 290

Professor Pippa Fineran, permission of Field Experience Office required

ENGL 495

Professor Kathy Kapitan

ENVS 400

Dr. James Hampton

ENVS 495

Dr. James Hampton

EXSC 495

Dr. Matt Hansen

FNBK 495

Dr. Scott Anderson

GDES 495

Professor Mary Mello-Nee

GWST 495

Dr. Annamaria Elsden

HIST 495

Dr. Bill Feis

MATH 495

Professor Timothy McDaniel

MGMT 495

Dr. Scott Anderson

MRKT 495

Dr. Scott Anderson

MRKT 496

Dr. Scott Anderson

MUSC 495

Dr. David Klee

PHIL/RELI 495

Dr. Laura Bernhardt

PHYS 495

Dr. Shawn Stone

PSCN 495

Dr. Brad Best

PSPA 495

Dr. Brad Best

PSYC 495

Dr. Bob Blodgett

SCWK 211

Susan Baker

SPAN 495

Dr. Scott Richey

SPED 396

Professor Pippa Fineran, permission of Field Experience Office required

THEA 495    

Dr. Mike Whitlatch